velosynth

open-source bicycle interaction computer
PROCESS DOCUMENTATION
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more information: http://velosynth.com
initiated + maintained by EFFALO
Jun 23
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SPIN transforms city streets into a playground for cyclists. This is made possible through an interactive handle-bar giving any bike a haptic interface to track personal performance and routes. This device consists of three sections: An intelligent light - blinker system, increasing the bikers visibility; a real-time buzz, informing you about things to look out while cycling; and a game shifter, making biking in the city a fun experience. As every cyclist is part of the SPIN online community, the collected information is simultaneously shared with other members, creating a relevant crowd-sourced database.”

Spin (by Vanessa Schauer)

May 26
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osirisproject:

Bicycle Seed Delivery through blown bubbles.  This is brilliant.

osirisproject:

Bicycle Seed Delivery through blown bubbles.  This is brilliant.

May 18
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learn how to make this here: robbykraft.com/​bikelight.pdf

bike wheel generator (by robby kraft)

May 16
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"Riding at night can be a daunting and dangerous task; many biking commuters are faced with the issue of being obscured when riding on the streets. Visibility at night is a vital component of biker safety, hence the need for reflectors and attachable lights. However, some of these devices are not always effective especially from the side.

We created a system that requires very little rider input and maintenance, while increasing the visual footprint of bikers from all directions especially from the side. We accomplished this by expanding the surface area of light emitted through the use of RGB LEDs inside the rims of the wheels that change from red when slowing down to white when at cruising speed.”

awesome project! really great process documentation, too: surg2011.tumblr.com

(Source: vimeo.com)

May 01
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Apr 30
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velosynth proposes to augment the bicycle with a layer of sound that encourages proxemic awareness within the transportation environment
— newly unfolded directive
Mar 10
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release #001 afterthoughts

the first release of velosynth has been out for about nine months now, so it’s worthwhile to give the release a bit of review and see what worked, and what didn’t. here’s some collected thoughts and analysis:

  • the whole device is too difficult to put together. very few people (if any?) were able to successfully assemble one. the breadboard + patchcable circuit-building process was not robust enough for the implied application, needs to be a printed circuit board instead.
  • the sound generator was esoteric and unpredictable, not to mention having an unpleasant palette of sounds.
  • no narrative in the documentation. although the different systems were fairly-well documented, there was no holistic sequence for guiding users on how to combine the individual parts in a useful way.
  • lack of good demo applications. there was not an effective example of how the device could be used in a real-world situation.
  • somewhat clumsy to install on the bicycle, things felt flimsy and temporary.

whereas the message of release #001 was ‘an open-source bicycle interaction computer,’ the emphasis of the next release should be placed upon enhancing the core pieces, to drive the idea toward accessibility:

  • improved synthesis interface. the device should have a constrained palette of simple waveforms and an effective system for controlling volume.
  • simplified form-factor. attaching the device to the bicycle must be faster; as easy as attaching bicycle lights.
  • more assumptions. instead of pursuing the ‘hackable interface’ angle as the driver behind system architecture, expectations need to be made about how the device should be used. from these assumptions, patterns of use can be developed which can outline areas for hacking.
Jan 11
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Jan 04
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Dec 11
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a bunch of parts being donated to the fuse factory in columbus, ohio — in return, they’re going to help update the docs

a bunch of parts being donated to the fuse factory in columbus, ohio — in return, they’re going to help update the docs